BURBANK, Calif. — By looking outside its IT and data-processing department, Logix Federal Credit Union automated nearly 70% of its data processing workload.

Prior to partnering with the Kingwood, Texas-based SMA Solutions (SMA stands for Software & Management Associates) in August 2013, Logix FCU had only managed to automate 35 processes.

“With the continued growth and need for more IT processes to handle various member needs and audit/system requirements, we needed to find a way to streamline our processing, basically to do more with less concerning our daily production,” said Logix FCU’s Data Processing Manager Joe Gates.

SMA Solutions’ Technical Account Manager Ben Demaree worked closely with Gates and his team. Together they identified that Logix FCU was having a difficult time keeping up with the growing workloads. And additional CU product offerings coupled with new federal regulations added to daily workloads.

“OpCon allowed them to manage their daily processing by exception instead of actively working each process,” said Demaree. “This gives them more time to code and test new processes in a timely manner.”

By deploying SMA Solutions’ automation tool, OpCon, Gates said more than 4,000 processes have been automated. The two standout automations were in ACH processing and “goodnight” automation.

For the former, Gates explained that the $3.8 billion CU, supporting approximately 135,000 members, made several previous attempts to automate ACH processing. After little success, it was through that a dedicated employee was required to arrive at 5 a.m. each day to operate the system. OpCon automated the process.

When it came to the Logix FCU’s end-of-day or “goodnight,” processing, this six-hour process was manually operated as well. Gates said that one human error in this environment could easily compound into several others. Without issue, OpCon automated this all-important process as well.

Along with a 70% automation conversion success rate, Gates said that 4,000 jobs and production tasks, file moves and vendor processes were implemented and data processing automated core-interacting processes with six other credit union departments (Audit, Card Services, Branch Support, Lending, Finance, Accounting) was achieved.

“With automation in place handling the majority of our production we were able to free-up staff allowing them to fine-tune processes, adding more IT-related tasks to our department, strengthen our disaster recovery systems and handle the ever-growing demands of our credit union,” said Gates.

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